Stan Stephens

Stan Stephens, co-owner of KOJM in Havre, helped define for all Montana broadcasters the impact a radio station has on its community. From 1953 to 1985, with partner Lyle Leeds, Stephens guided KOJM to a policy of local fund-raisers and free air time for citizens to speak on key issues. Stephens developed the art of the radio editorial, winning RTNDA’s Edward R. Murrow award in 1975 for exposing a workmen’s compensation scandal. Stephens served as Governor of Montana from 1989-93. Of the non-revenue aspect of public service broadcasting, Stephens said, “You cash it in within yourself, with the pride of what you’re doing and the recognition that it’s worthwhile and...

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Ron Cass

Ron Cass was born in Harlowton and began his broadcast career as a disc jockey and play-by-play announcer in Hettinger, ND in 1967. In 1973 he moved to Anaconda where he worked as an announcer and account executive at KANA. A year later he moved to KXLF Radio-TV in Butte where he continued in that dual capacity until being named Sales Manager of KXLF-TV in 1979. In 1982 he was named VP / General Manager of KXLF-TV and in 1986 became President and General Manager of KXLF-TV and KBZK-TV, Butte-Bozeman. Ron served as the host of the Butte 4th of July Parade for 28 years and as host of the Jerry Lewis MDA Telethon for 20. He served as a member of the CBS Television Affiliates Board, on the Butte-Silverbow Local Government Study Commission, the Police Commission, the Chamber of Commerce, the United Way, the Exchange Club and the Literacy Project along with many others. He is a Past President of the Montana Broadcasters Association. As Senator Conrad Burns read into the Congressional Record, “Butte is a better place because of Ron...

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Dan Miller

“Major” Dan Miller began his career at KOOK radio in Billings in 1958, shortly after graduating from the Don Martin School of Radio Arts in Hollywood, California.  Dan loved Billings and Billings loved Dan. He spent his entire career in Billings working as an announcer, in radio sales and as a General Manager. He also piloted KOOK radio’s hot air balloon for more than a decade and was the first to do a commercial radio broadcast from a hot air balloon in Montana on July 4, 1976. In 1971, Dan received Billboard Magazine’s “Radio Personality of the Year Award” and has received numerous awards from the MBA. He was inducted into the Montana Broadcasters Hall of Fame in 2004. Dan served in the US Army for two years at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri during the Korean War which is where he first became acquainted with Route 66.  In 1955, he married Donna Mandella. They have three children; Daniel, Darrin and Dawn Holly, 5 grandchildren and 3 great grandchildren. Now retired, the “Major” continues to do his weekly “Miller’s Gold” show on MoJo 92.5 and hosts “Great Gold” on the community television station. He is active in numerous community and civic groups and is a lay reader at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church. Known to all as “Major” Dan, an honorary title he earned during the Sputnik era when listeners voted him to “go into orbit.” He jokes that the title came “in lieu of a pay...

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Dave Wilson

Dave Wilson, a veteran Montana radio broadcaster, was born in Hamilton, Alabama and grew up listening to shows like the Grand Ol’Opry, Gunsmoke and the Lone Ranger. Entering the music field as a band leader, Dave played on WVOK radio in Birmingham, Alabama on the “Noon Jamboree”. He went on the road as part of a singing group that eventually came to Montana. Returning to live in Great Falls, he began selling radio at KUDI radio in 1968. Soon a desire to be on the air took him to KMON radio where Al Donohue hired him part time in 1969, then full time in 1970. Soon Dave took on the morning shift where in 1976 he was named “The Most Listened to Announcer in Montana.” Dave also created the radio program “Grass Roots Gold” which is still in syndication today. Over the years Dave worked for KEIN and KIKF radio in Great Falls, KGVO radio in Missoula and even a brief time at WMC in Memphis, Tenn. But he always called KMON radio his home, working there for more than 35 years as morning man, Program Director & Operations Manager. In 2009, after 40 years in radio, Dave semi-retired with his wife Cheryl. You can still hear Dave on his on-line station, Dave Wilson Country.com His voice continues to be heard on numerous radio and television commercials. Through the years he has served as M.C. for innumerable charity and entertainment...

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Cato Butler

Cato Butler, who in 2013 said he had the longest tenure of any Montana broadcaster with 65 years, was born in Helena, Mt. on October 29, 1929, the day the stock market crashed. Cato started his radio career as a junior at Helena High School in 1946 on KPFA which became KLFJ and then KBLL. In the 1950s he personally bought time on KFDW radio in Helena to broadcast the Carroll College football games. In 1970 he began broadcasting sports on KCAP radio in Helena. In 1972 he became full time News/Sports Director for KCAP. He covered mostly high school and college basketball and football games at Helena High, Capital High, Butte High, Carroll College and the University of Montana. He also covered track, boxing, golf, baseball, and horse racing. He was famous as the voice of the Class C basketball tournaments. For his work as a sportscaster he was named Montana Sports Broadcaster of the Year and inducted into the Helena Sports Hall of Fame. He was also inducted into the prestigious Montana Broadcasters Hall of Fame in 2010. Among his most important news stories he covered were the Montana prison riots, the Earthquake near Yellowstone Park and elections. Cato retired and came back to KCAP part time in 1984. In 1985 he began “Open Line”, an hour live call-in radio talk show which continues today. In 2003 the Mayor of Helena proclaimed Cato Butler Day honoring Cato for his service to the community. Interested in Western History all of his life, he was adopted into the Blackfeet Tribe when he was 10 years old and given the name “Eagle Child”. Noted for his distinctive style and original phrases were strong reasons why he had such a large and loyal following. .He often signed off from game broadcasts with, “It’s time to saddle up and...

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